« Community 2.0 | Main | Magic and Fun with Emerging Technologies »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451954769e200d834f266a553ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Blindness to the Deep Structures of Globalization:

Comments

Hank Heath

You seem to be preaching to the choir - to look at the other comments.

I'm involved in a business that outsources a LOT of our work. So, my perspective is that, yes, there is a pull model needed for determining future work. And there is a push model that also needs to be built. The resulting balance between the two will give the best results.

For example, we have just moved our global call management skills off-shore after a year's training. However, we retain a group of flexible analysts here in the US ready to create new opportunities and processes. Once the new processes are proven, off-shore them, and restart the process.

Ken

The manufacturing guys at Evolving Excellence also commented on your article.

http://www.evolvingexcellence.com/blog/2007/04/blind_to_the_pu.html

Daniel W Rasmus

I think you are right on with this line of reasoning. In the end, there will be plenty of work, the workers may not be in the right place or right time zone, but that is an adaptive structural problem that can be solved. What can't be solved is people recognizing new models and embracing them.

A few additional comments here John.

http://future-of-work.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!C07907DBA0E3BEA6!554.entry

gregory

globalization, for or against, is a pointless argument.... everything is already globalized... and always has been... our awareness is slow to catch up, but that is how it is... nature is fully globalized and has been from the beginning.... so adjust our minds and businesses to what already is....

gregory

globalization, for or against, is a pointless argument.... everything is already globalized... and always has been... our awareness is slow to catch up, but that is how it is... nature is fully globalized and has been from the beginning.... so adjust our minds and businesses to what already is....

David Scott Lewis

Mohan, why is offshoring jobs to developing countries a good thing -- at least from an American perspective? In my recent Tech China blog post (http://tinyurl.com/2x99kc) I talked about why it may be a good thing, but even I'm not totally convinced at the gut level (although the macro arguments are quite compelling). And, IMHO, MGI lies through their teeth when it comes to their forecasts: We ALL know that they're deceiving us, we ALL know that tremendous job loss occurs as a result of offshoring.

However, all of this may be irrelevant for reasons I'll describe in my next Sand Hill Group "Letter from China" column (http://tinyurl.com/2yu2uj) titled, "Lou Dobbs is Right -- And Wrong".

Let's go back to the Cold War. We won the Cold War, perhaps more due to economics than any other reason. Why shouldn't the U.S. stop the economic rise of the BRIC countries in order to secure its place in the global economy? In other words, why not take preemptive action to thwart the development of the BRIC + 3 countries? Alas, maybe such a strategy is truly in the best interest of Americans in the long(er)-term, even if it causes economic disruptions in the short(er)-term. Interesting public policy perspective, eh? And if you think it can't be done, perhaps you need to fire a few more synapses to get the picture.

Mohan

I will not claim to be an expert on globalization or economic theory or even free trade. However, jobs being generated in India (and rest of the 'Third World') is a good thing.

Now, the bigger question to economists like Mr. Blinder: Is the ‘global job pie’ remain static or will it grow due to free-trade and globalization? If the sum total is going to grow, it is a “win win” deal; right?

vinnie mirchandani

Not sure most analysis takes in to account what happens with the "freed up" economics. The disposable income the US middle class got from reliable, more price stable autos over last two decades has allowed for more spending in other areas. I like to say Wal-Mart unpopular as it is has written the US middle class more tax credit checks than Reagan, Clinton, Bush ever did. Those checks may not have helped other retailers but they paid for more travel, real estate, whatever. Offshoring while painful in some ways has freed up dollars for other spend. Not sure we measure well what sectors those savings go towards.

Also, if what happened with Japan is true Chinese and Indian consumers will spend at Disney, Harrods, Apple, our real estate etc.

Far better for us to encourage our companies to have products attractive to those markets. GE, Pepsi, Citibank do. GM and Ford do not. The Koreans and Japanese dominate with their small cars. Delta which had the flagship route to India (back to Pan Am) days now has less than 3% market share on the booming US India air traffic.

Also should jawbone the emerging economies it cannot be one way trade...I will take a Carla Hills any day to pound on the Chinese and Indians to open up their markets over Lou Dobbs who would rather shut down our borders.

The comments to this entry are closed.